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New Junior Wobblies website

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Junior Wobblies Camp will be back bigger and better than ever in summer 2015! We are excited to announce that camp will be in session August 15th-19th at our new location, Camp Holiday in Deerwood, MN! Please check out our website and stay posted to hear updates on JRWU Camp 2015.

What is Junior Wobblies camp?

Every year families from across the United States and Canada gather to share a summer camp like no other. Junior Wobblies is the children’s camp of the Industrial Workers of the World. A chance for our children to gather together and explore the themes of our shared working class history, culture, and struggles, both historical and contemporary, in a safe and loving atmosphere embodying the themes of solidarity and mutual aid. This camp gives children a chance to find their own place within the movement and their own identities as Junior Wobblies. Located in an outdoor setting and facilitated by devoted volunteer organizers and counsellors it is a chance for children and adults to have a family holiday experience while at the same time building relationships and reinforcing their ties to the broader class struggle.

Our new website can be found at http://juniorwobblies.wordpress.com/

15 Per Hour at UPS

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From 15 Per Hour at UPS

We hear people talking about it every night. “Shit, we should be making a hell of a lot more than we do for working this hard!” “They’re gonna have to pay me way better if they want me to do that!” And we all agree, but we also know that words alone won’t turn into raises. So last month some sturdy friends of Screw Ups braved the icy terrors of winter to collect signatures on a petition calling for a $15/hour starting wage at UPS, and a corresponding $5 raise for everyone. We weren’t surprised by the positive responses–nearly 100 signatures at both the Minneapolis and Eagan hub!–and it was great to see people getting fired up about making a real improvement to our jobs.

Making a push to raise wages at UPS without waiting 4 years for the next contract is certainly ambitious. But we all know how big of a difference an extra $5 per hour would make in our lives. And let’s face it; lots of us won’t even be working here in four years. We deserve better wages now, not when (and if) union and company negotiators feel like it. That’s why we’re going to fight for it. Nobody is promising we can make it happen. But we are promising to fight for it.

Whether you’ve been at UPS for a week, or a decade, or longer, you know that they always demand MORE. More accuracy, more speed, more sacrifice. This is especially true during peak season, when UPS relies on us most to keep the operation running and their profits flooding in. Year after year, we make billions of dollars for the company, and what do we get in return? Poverty wages (and the occasional pizza at break). This is what UPS thinks all of our hard work is worth. But we’re willing to bet that most of the time, and especially at Peak, the effort you put into your job goes far beyond what most people working part time jobs for $10 (or $11, or $12, or more) an hour give.
If we want to stop the daily wishing for higher wages, we have to get serious about it. We’re smart enough by now to know UPS won’t just give us things when we ask nicely. We have to show them what we’re worth. Show UPS what you think $10/hour work looks like, and they might start to understand what we’re worth. Keep it up, and they won’t have a choice but to find a way to show that our work is actually important to them.

It is going to take a big group of us putting pressure on UPS to get this raise. If you want to join in and work for better wages, we want you to get in touch with us! We are ready to start moving forward, and there are a few ways you can get involved right away. Check us out at www.facebook.com/15dollarsUPS or send an email to screwups[at]riseup.net.

Employing & Empowering More Staff & Teachers of Color: Petition to Minneapolis & St. Paul School Boards

From Twin Cities IWW Education Organizing Committee

Minneapolis and St Paul students, educators, parents, and community, please sign and share this!

We need more staff and teachers of color who bring creative, critical, powerful things to our schools.

Sign the petition here: http://tinyurl.com/empowerMPS

Action in solidarity with Amazon workers in Poland

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From ScrewUps Newswire

In January 2015, UPS part-timers affiliated with the Screw Ups newsletter in Minneapolis, USA took actions in solidarity with striking Amazon workers in Poland. We stopped scanning Amazon packages and spread campaign propaganda to Amazon customers in the USA with pro-zsp stickers attached to their packages.

The Polish Amazon workers have faced harsh working conditions and “irregularities”, like late pay or lack of payments for some parts of their salary. ZSP, the union at Amazon Poland is fighting to get back pay for workers and to improve the overall working conditions.

Working at UPS, we see thousands of Amazon packages shipped every day to customers all across the United States and beyond. Amazon relies on a massive workforce to fulfill all of these orders. Despite their enormous profits and plans to expand their business further, Amazon workers across the world still struggle to make a living. As UPS workers, we know this feeling all too well. While we work for shit wages and low hours, UPS continues making record profits. Just as we fight for better conditions at work, we took these actions to support Amazon workers struggling to improve their lives as a gesture of Solidarity. An Injury to One is an Injury to All!

For more information on the ZSP campaign at Amazon Poland, visit:
http://zsp.net.pl/zsp/english.

Work Peoples College picture (circa 1937)

Work Peoples College, Duluth, circa 1937

Here’s a picture of Work Peoples College attendees in Duluth, Minnesota, circa 1937. For more information on the historical WPC, check out “Educate, Organize, Emancipate: The Work People’s College and The Industrial Workers of the World” by Saku Pinta. For information on the current WPC, visit their website.

Picture source: The One Big Union Monthly (September 1937)